Finnie welcomes Coul Links ‘Call in’

Highlands and Islands Green MSP John Finnie has today (24/08/2018) welcomed news that the Scottish Government will ‘call in’ the Coul Links planning application.

Mr Finnie wrote to the Scottish Government in June requesting that they call in the application.

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John Finnie MSP at Coul Links

Commenting, Mr Finnie said:

“I’m delighted that the Scottish Government has taken the decision to call in the Coul Links application. There are serious concerns that this proposed development could irreparably damage the magnificent natural dune environment at Coul Links and I am pleased the Minister has recognised the need for further scrutiny. I have been making the case that the significant protections afforded to this site must actually mean something, as have conservation charities, and even the Scottish Government’s own natural heritage agency objected. Now that this application rests with the Scottish Ministers I know the many Highlanders that have been in touch with me in recent months will be expecting them to thoroughly scrutinise the environmental evidence – something the Highland Council failed to do – and in the face of that overwhelming evidence, reject the application.”

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John’s letter requesting the application be called in.

Mass culling of mountain hares must stop, says Finnie

Highlands and Islands Green MSP John Finnie has called on the Scottish Government to urgently introduce a moratorium on the culling of mountain hares in the Highlands as new figures reveal the number of mountain hares in the eastern Highlands has dropped by more than 99 per cent since 1954.

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Mr Finnie said:

“Scottish Ministers have repeatedly stated that they do not support mass culling of mountain hares, yet it is happening all the same.

“Minister’s calls for ‘voluntary restraint’ are being blatantly ignored and it is therefore time that strong action is taken to protect this iconic, native species.

“We’re told by cull advocates that the main reason for culling hares is to increase red grouse densities. As if shooting hares just so there are more grouse to shoot wasn’t bad enough, there is no clear evidence that mountain hare culls actually increase red grouse densities.

“As is so often the case with blood sports, the real reasons for shooting appears more about tradition than species management.

“If estates are not willing to exercise voluntary restraint, and it is clear that many aren’t, then it is imperative that the Scottish Government takes the decision out of their hands and introduces measures to protect the mountain hare.”

Finnie Calls for Scottish Government to Stop Prevaricating on Coul Links

In response to the decision of Scottish Ministers to extend their consideration on whether to call in the Coul Links planning application, John Finnie, Green MSP for Highlands and Islands, said:

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John Finnie MSP at Coul Links

“The proposed golf development at Coul Links presents a significant threat to a nationally and internationally protected site on the shores of Loch Fleet. Highland Council’s North Planning Committee completely ignored the environmental evidence and it is therefore vital that the Scottish Government step up and call in this proposal, which its own natural heritage agency objected to. Allowing this proposal to go ahead, in the face of all the evidence, would completely undermine environmental designations across Scotland. I have been inundated with correspondence from constituents in the Highlands and Islands, over 1300 to date, opposed to this environmental vandalism.”

“Before parliament went into recess the First Minister assured me that ‘It is our intention to honour obligations that currently arise from EU membership, but we have been clear in our resolve not to see environmental protections or other protections downgraded as a result of Brexit.’ In light of this commitment it is difficult to understand the need for a delay, when this development threatens international obligations such as the Ramsar Convention, and I once again urge the Scottish Government to stop prevaricating on this issue and call in the application without further delay.”

John asks Comhairle to protect Isles’ few remaining trees

Tree at Loch Druidibeg, South Uist, by Molly Duker. CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.
Tree at Loch Druidibeg, South Uist, by Molly Duker. CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.
John Finnie has written to the Chief Executive of the Comhairle nan Eilean Siar, asking the council to use its powers to defend the Western Isles’ trees.

The islands’ natural condition is to be covered by forest, but deforestation by humans has led to the present environment, described by Scottish Natural Heritage as “generally treeless”.

Mr Finnie has asked the council to grant Tree Preservation Orders (TPOs) to the Western Isles’ remaining trees, to defend the those that still exist and provide a stable base for expanding woodland on the islands.

John said:

“Woodland is good for people, for wild plant and animal species, and for the rural economy. The Western Isles are one of the most deforested parts of Scotland, so it makes sense to use already existing powers to defend the remaining trees.

“Native woodland in the Western Isles is even more seriously threatened. The 2004 Native Woodlands Habitat Action Plan estimated that there was just 200 hectares of semi-natural woodland left on the islands, and set a target of ensuring no net loss in area or reduction in quality of these ecologically and historically precious areas.

“The rules for TPOs specify that the Order must protect either ‘amenity’ or trees of ‘cultural or historical significance’. Any further loss of trees on the islands would clearly be a blow to local people’s wellbeing – or ‘amenity’ – and there can be no doubt that our remaining native woodland is of both cultural and historical significance.”

John’s letter to the Comhairle nan Eilean Siar Chief Executive, Malcolm Burr, reads:

Dear Malcolm,

Thank you for your email of 24 August regarding Tree Preservation Orders (TPO).

I disagree that it is self-evident that a TPO protecting all of the Western Isles’ non-commercial trees would fail the tests set by statute.

From having been a substantially wooded archipelago when they were settled by humans after the last ice age, the Western Isles have become, in the words of Scottish Natural Heritage “generally treeless”.

Given the known positive social impact of trees, I would argue that the Isles’ treelessness is of sufficient concern that protecting what few trees remain is very much “expedient in the interest of amenity”.

The situation of native woodlands in particular is even more grave. In 2004, the Native Woodlands Habitat Action Plan estimated the area of semi-natural woodland in the Western Isles at just 200ha, and set a target of “ensur[ing] no net loss in area or reduction in quality of native woodlands. In this context, the remaining native woodland would seem to be of “cultural or historical significance”, and warrant protection via TPOs.

I am certain that the Planning Service is reactive and does take into account the amenity and historic value of trees when considering planning applications, but removal of trees in and of itself does not require planning permission. Without TPOs, the Council has no locus to intervene.

Given the precarious situation of woodland in the Western Isles, and the great importance of woodland to environmental and public health, I would be grateful if you would reconsider my proposal to make a Tree Preservation Order, or a number of contiguous Tree Preservation Orders, to defend the Western Isles’ non-commercial trees.

Kind regards

John Finnie MSP

John opposes unfiltered sewage plan for Gairloch

Children playing in the water at Gairloch beach.
Children playing in the water at Gairloch beach.
Photo: Gairloch by Kyle Taylor. CC BY 2.0.
John Finnie has spoken out against Scottish Water plans to remove the filtration system from their waste water treatment works at Gairloch, exposing some of the Highland’s best beaches to high quantities of harmful bacteria.

John has lodged a formal objection with the Scottish Environmental Protection Agency (SEPA), urging them not to grant permission for the downgrade.

The proposal to replace the current membrane filter system with simple septic tanks would result in bacteria from human waste, such as E. Coli, being pumped into the Loch. Scottish Water’s own studies show that the bacteria would make the waters and beaches unfit for bathing up to 3 kilometres from the outflow – an area that includes the much-loved beaches at Gairloch and Big Sand.

John said:

Registry Department, Scottish Environmental Protection Agency, Graesser House, Fodderty Way, Dingwall, IV15 9XB. Thursday 4 August 2016. Dear Sir/Madam,  Fhasaich (Gairloch) Sewage Treatment Works, CAR/L/1002928.  I wish to object to the above application by Scottish Water, which seeks permission to replace the present membrane filtration system with a system of septic tanks.  The applicant describes its proposal as “more sustainable” than the present arrangement, but the accompanying dispersion study demonstrates that it would increase the discharge of faecal coliform in volumes sufficient to render the surrounding beaches unfit for bathing.  Though the beaches at Big Sand and Gairloch are not yet designated bathing waters, they are in fact well-used for swimming and other watersports, and I understand the local community has recently applied for bathing designation. These beaches are important to the local tourist economy, and to the quality of life of local people, and both are well within the 3000m of the outflow within which the Scottish Water dispersal study calculates both the mandatory and guideline standards for designated bathing waters would be breached if the application is granted.  Loch Gairloch boasts two sites on the Scottish Wildlife Trust’s North West Highlands Snorkel Trail, including at Carn Dearg, approximately 1000m from the proposed outflow. At that range the dispersion study calculates the concentration of faecal coliform would exceed the mandatory limit by over 200% (6790/100ml as against a limit of 2000/100ml).  The downgrading of effluent treatment proposed in this application is justified by cost savings alone; there appears to be no suggestion from any party that the proposal represents an improvement in environmental protection.  The greatly increased bacterial pollution that would result from the license variation would be likely to damage the economy of the local area, and the health of both local and tourist users of the Loch. It would also unfairly pre-empt the community’s application for designation as a bathing area.  I believe that these adverse social and economic impacts are more than sufficient to conclude that the application should be denied. Yours sincerely, John Finnie MSP
Click here to read John’s letter of objection to the Gairloch sewage plan (PDF).
“Big Sand was recently voted the best beach in the Highlands, with Gairloch coming in fourth. These beautiful beaches are well-used by tourists and locals alike for swimming, snorkelling, kayaking and other watersports.

“If the proposed downgrade of the sewage works goes ahead, both beaches would be exposed to a volume of dangerous bacteria that would breach the safety limits set for designated bathing areas. This would be particularly unfair given that the community are right now trying to gain designated bathing status for their beaches – this would pre-empt their efforts by spoiling the water before they have a chance to protect it.

“Scottish Water cannot be given permission to endanger the health of bathers, the economy of the community and the quality of life of local people just to save some money. I very much hope that SEPA will recognise the unacceptable cost to the area, and decline this unnecessary and damaging proposal.”

John To Host Holyrood Meeting on Arderseir Waste Water Plant

 

John has secured a meeting with Scottish Water bosses to discuss their controversial plans for a new waste water treatment plant in Ardersier. The meeting will take place at the Scottish Parliament next Wednesday (8 June), and Scottish Water have asked to invite all other Highlands and Islands MSP, and the member for the Inverness and Nairn constituency, Rural Economy Cabinet Secretary Fergus Ewing.

John has given his support to the community campaign against the plans, which would see the historic village of just over 1000 residents become home to a sewage treatment plant intended to serve thousands of homes in developments along the A96 corridor.

Commenting John said:

“I’m glad I’ll be able to put the community’s objections to the waste plant directly to Scottish Water.

“Ardersier is an historic village with narrow roads and many houses dating back to the 18th century. Buildings are already suffering structural damage from coaches and military traffic to Fort George, and heavy construction traffic would cause very serious harm.

“The village’s growing tourist economy is highly dependent on its beautiful coastal environment. The beach is an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty and the land adjacent to the planned works is a Site of Special Scientific Interest. All this could be put at risk by the proposals.

“Scottish Water say the waste treatment works shouldn’t smell if it is working properly – most who have the misfortune to live near one know that that is a big ‘if’.

“Ardersier is just an inappropriate location for this development, so I’ll be urging Scottish Water to re-examine the alternatives.”

John warns on ship-to-ship oil transfer impact on Moray Firth orcas

SaveOurDolphins_800x450 John has warned the pod of orcas that enchanted Moray Firth ocean-watchers last week could be put at risk if controversial plans to allow ship-to-ship oil transfers in the Firth are given the go-ahead.

John, who has been campaigning to stop the proposal, pressed the Scottish Government for details of the dangers posed to the orcas by oil transfers. He urged the new Cabinet Secretary for Environment, Climate Change and Land Reform, Roseanna Cunningham MSP, to make the Scottish Government’s position clear.

Cromarty Firth Port Authority has applied for a license for the risky ship-to-ship procedure, in which oil is transferred between vessels in the open sea rather than secured in a harbour. The application is presently being considered by the UK’s Maritime and Coastguard Agency.

The orca pod, known as the Northern Isles community, migrates between Iceland and the Moray Firth each year. It would be vulnerable to any oil spill in the Firth resulting from ship-to-ship transfer operations.

The Scottish Greens have a strong track record in protecting coastal communities from ship-to-ship plans. A three-year campaign by Green MSPs to halt similar plans in the Firth of Forth ended in victory when Forth Ports PLC dropped their proposal in 2008. John Finnie launched the Save Our Dolphins campaign in response to the Moray Firth plan in January this year; his petition at http://bit.ly/SaveOurDolphins has received over 3,700 signatures.

John said:

“The sighting of these extraordinary animals is a reminder of how precious the environment of the Moray Firth is, both for its wildlife and for its people.

“Oil transfers are already carried out safely in the relative shelter of Nigg harbour; there’s no need to put our Firth in danger with risky ship-to-ship transfers in the open sea.

“I’m trying to find out whether the Scottish Government understands the threat to the orcas and the whole Firth ecosystem. If it does, I hope new Environment Minister Roseanna Cunningham will break the silence that her predecessor inexplicably maintained on the issue, and join the opposition to the proposal.

“The Moray Firth is one of Scotland’s most important marine habitats. As well as orcas and our iconic bottlenose dolphins, it is an important area for seabirds, wading birds, seals and otters. It’s a vital fishery and a centre for the production of shellfish. It’s an excellent location for windsurfing, kayaking and other water sports. All that is in danger if we allow oil transfers to go ahead.

“Greens MSPs have beaten ship-to-ship plans once before, in the Firth of Forth. With your help we can do it again: please sign the petition at bit.ly/SaveOurDolphins.”