Occupational Segregation in the Highlands and Islands

Highlands and Islands MSP John Finnie has welcomed the publication of the report, Occupational Segregation in the Highlands and Islands, commissioned by Highlands and Islands Enterprise.

Green MSP Finnie, said:

 

“I welcome the publication of this important report, which coincided with International Women’s day. The research demonstrates that there is much work to be done if we are to end gender based inequality in the Highlands and Islands.

 

“I am particularly supportive of the recommendation for a region-wide strategic approach to the issue and I hope this can be brought forward as soon as possible.”

 

Full motion:

 

Motion Number: S5M-04536
Lodged By: John Finnie
Date Lodged: 09/03/2017

Title: Occupational Segregation in the Highlands and Islands

Motion Text:

That the Parliament welcomes the publication of the report, Occupational Segregation in the Highlands and Islands, which was commissioned by Highlands and Islands Enterprise; notes that the research, which was carried out by Ekosgen, identified that occupational segregation is more pronounced in the Highlands and Islands than the rest of Scotland, impacting on individuals, employers and the economy; understands that the study highlighted that employment rates for men (82.8%) and women (75.3%) in the region exceed the Scottish average but that employment levels are higher among men compared to women, and that the difference is more marked than for Scotland as a whole; considers that the report, which was published to coincide with International Women’s Day, identified that, while occupational segregation impacts on both genders, it is more often women that experience the negative consequences, and that there is clear evidence of a gender pay gap in the Highlands and Islands, with men more likely to work in more senior well-paid positions and women more prevalent in less senior roles, and with the types of jobs often reflecting traditional views of what is “women’s work” and “men’s work”, and that these patterns persist across most sectors and are evident in subject choices across modern apprenticeships and further and higher education; believes that the report highlights a range of factors that contribute to this, including perpetuating stereotypes, workplace practices and cultures, working patterns and structural barriers such as availability of childcare, and that it states that, while there is a need to acknowledge local circumstances, there is a need for a region-wide strategic approach to address the issue, and considers that such a strategic approach should be brought forward as soon as possible in order to ensure that the same opportunities are available to all regardless of gender.